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  • Karen Edmond

The Evolution Of The Emasculated Black Man & Why Gay Agenda Is Rejected By Most Black Churches.

Homosexuality, defined by Webster Dictionary, is "sexual or romantic attraction to others of one's same-sex." Historically, polytheistic societies exercised unrestrained attitudes in sexuality mainly because of their religions, which condoned said sexual practices. We see this example in Roman, Sumerian, and Greek cultures. It was merely a way of life at the stated time.



With the evolution of Christianity in Rome grew an intolerance of said sexual practices. This happened around 312 A.D. A Roman emperor by the name of Constantine converts to Christianity. By 313 AD, the two leaders of the Roman empire, Constantine and Licinius, issued the "Edict of Milan." That law made Christianity one of the official religions of Rome. Upon this conversion plus enforcement of Christianity, intolerance rose regarding homosexuality's religious and sexual practices. A monotheistic belief system was adopted. Constantine's reign extended to Spain plus Europe, where the same paganistic belief systems were practiced typically until the rise of Christianity and Roman domination. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Constantine-I-Roman-emperor




So you may be asking yourself, "what does this have to do with the Black church?" I'm glad you asked. In America, the Black Church is the offshoot branch of physically mistreated African chattel slavery & 1st nation genocide survivors. The nature of the systematic processes to emasculating Black boys and men intended to control the mind. Hence one of the practices levied on enslaved African and 1st nation boys and men were gay. Said sexual procedures were performed against enslaved peoples' will. Colonists believed that said practice would impede Black men's development to be protectors or providers of their families. The implication of said treatment on boys and men left both a psychological and psychiatric overture on how said man or boy perceived himself in the area of manhood. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/investigations/2019/02/08/1619-african-arrival-virginia/2740468002/




Colonists regularly executed gay practices on enslaved Black men and boys to strip away their manhood and make them ready for the auction block. Some believe that this traumatization contributes to the current Black male dysfunction in America up until this day. Hence homosexuals, whether men or women carry the same traits that their early forefathers exhibited per their penal colonists' paganistic nature. This treatment of Black men, women, and children was demonstrated, consistently between the 1700's through the 1800's. Hence the Black church's perception of gay behavior was deemed non-desirable and executed regularly by colonist slave masters and cohorts. To make matters worse, more and more enslaved people were learning how to read. And upon reading holy scriptures found that said practices did not line up with biblical teaching.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HF1lC6BRlmE

(Below picture 1870s Mt. Pisgah AME Philadelphia)




Per a PBS documentary titled "Slavery and the Making of America" explains how Black Americans experienced "mental and physical degradation and were denied their basic rights" by western settlers' hands. The fact is that White penal colonists were not just racist and sadistic in their behavior towards enslaved children and their parents. But that also one of their attributes were that they were indeed gay. https://www.jstor.org/stable/41305880?seq=1 Today many gays in America believe that the Black Church, in particular, is intolerant to their lifestyle. And that the Black church doesn't put their gay agendas first like other religions have. For example, per an article titled "Blacks, Gays, And The Church by Corey Dade shares, "Fairly or not, African-Americans have become the public face of resistance to same-sex marriage, owing to their religious beliefs and the outspoken opposition of many black pastors." https://www.npr.org/2012/05/22/153282066/blacks-gays-and-the-church-a-complex-relationship



Per a 2015 Pew study on the topic of "Where Christian Churches, Other Religions Stand On Gay Marriage written by David Masci and Michael Lipka, states that "Many of the largest U.S. religious institutions have remained firmly against allowing same-sex marriage." Study list some of the religions that support the gay agenda are

  • Conservative Jewish Movement

  • Episcopal Church

  • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America


  • Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)

  • Reform Jewish Movement

  • Society of Friends (Quaker)

  • Unitarian Universalist Assoc. of Churches

  • United Church of Christ


Per an NBC news article written by George Johnson titled White Gay Privilege Exists All Year, But It Is Particularly Hurtful During Pride," shares "All communities struggle in some way with race, and the LGBTQ community is no different. Racism has always played a role in relationships between white and Black queer people." This statement provides evidence of how gay organizations exercise their White privilege to a fault and demonstrates why communication to people of color exposes cognitive dissonance plus White supremacist characteristics. https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/white-gay-privilege-exists-all-year-it-particularly-hurtful-during-ncna1024961

Sociologist Robin DiAngelo's White Fragility https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45ey4jgoxeU



The traumatizing effect left by slave owners is why the Black Church colloquially remembers what gay white supremacists did last summer. One thing that needs to be said is that within the group of gay populations are gay people who are sincerely aware of the history and the trauma inherited by Black America. This particular group, although traumatized themselves, will give you the shirt off their back and will stand with you when speaking truth to power. This specific population holds more of an abolitionist mentality on the most part and will call out racists bad behavior publicly. (Example CNN's Don Lemon)


So gays and their supporters must understand that the reflection of homosexuality is not the same picture that the traditional Black church sees. The traditional Black church remembers the trauma that leads Black men to be anything other than men because of the constant berating, beatings, rapes, and non-help from the past and the present thanks to systematic racism and post traumatic slave syndrome behavior. Institution further acknowledges that if said behavior is not addressed, that behavior will more than likely be acted out against the will of the next generation. Hence, one of the Black church's missions is to intervene and help survivors of slavery unlearn behaviors introduced to them by slaveholders while advocating for the enforcement of citizenship rights and privileges on behalf of Black folks here in America. (Faith without works is dead.) WWJD 101.




The bible says that we should "live peaceably with all men." That statement is a two-way street. Gay organizations in America are majority White. And because they are majority White they will not understand or, in most cases, respect the Black church's stance. Both groups have cultural characteristics that are different from one and another. Gay organizations must approach Black institutions such as the church with respect and not condemnation. They further must stop being angry because the Black church didn't drop their work and immediately pick up and do the work per gay agenda. Slavery is over. And things will never be the same.





Thank you for reading! I left a few links that provide validation to commentary. Plus a classic Carter G Woodson audio share of his unique book, "The Mis-Education of the Negro," below.


Please enjoy Tye Tribrett's Work It Out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HF1lC6BRlmE The Mis-Education of the Negro. Carter G. Woodson


Journals & Articles:

  • Majors, R. & Billson J.M. (1992). Cool Pose: The Dilemmas of Black Manhood in America. New York: Touchstone. Pope-Hennessy, J. (2004).

  • Sins of the Fathers: The Atlantic Slave Traders 1441-1807. Edison: Castle Books. Smallwood, S.E. (2007).

  • Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Stampp, K.M. (1984).

  • The Peculiar Institution: Slavery and the Ante-Bellum South. New York: Vintage Books. Thomas A. & Sillen, S. (1972.)

  • Racism and Psychiatry. New York: Brunner/Mazel Publishers. 16 Woodson, C.G. (2005). The Mis-Education of the Negro. Mineola: Dover Publications. Dubois, W.E.B. (September 1902). Of the training of Black Men. The Atlantic Monthly. 247(4).

  • Rasberry, W. (1986, January 31). Plight of the Young Black Man. Washington Post. 21.










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